Integrated Solutions for the Traceability of Products

Aggregation supports pharmaceutical manufacturers and combats the rise of counterfeit products by improving supply-chain visibility. Aggregation technology is quickly becoming a hot topic because of its role in traceability for pharmaceutical manufacturers.

The European Union’s Falsified Medicine Directive addresses the growing danger of counterfeit medication on the market. The directive came into effect in February 2019 and mandates complete traceability of individual packages. Wholesalers and dispensaries must establish the authenticity of package contents.

Aggregation supports pharmaceutical manufacturers and combats the rise of counterfeit products by improving supply-chain visibility. Aggregation technology is quickly becoming a hot topic because of its role in traceability for pharmaceutical manufacturers.

The European Union’s Falsified Medicine Directive addresses the growing danger of counterfeit medication on the market. The directive came into effect in February 2019 and mandates complete traceability of individual packages. Wholesalers and dispensaries must establish the authenticity of package contents.

U.S. Industry Pressure

While there are no legal requirements for aggregation in the United States, the pharmaceutical industry is increasingly using aggregation technology to increase supply-chain security. Representatives from some of the top pharmaceutical companies in the country have made it clear they expect their contract packagers to implement aggregation in addition to serialization requirements as a way of improving end-to-end product traceability.

In the U.S., pharmaceutical companies must have serialization systems implemented by law.

However, manufacturers are now adding aggregation to their processes to give themselves a complete track and trace system.

Benefits of Aggregation

In order to keep track of each individually marked package without aggregation, each carton must be scanned at every step of the distribution process. Aggregation allows cartons to be bundled together; scanning one barcode will automatically link every carton in a given bundle. Being able to pull the complete list of cartons in a bundle means that manufacturers can identify and rectify weaknesses in their distribution chain should a carton go missing or be found in the wrong place.

Implementing Aggregation

Much of the infrastructure required for aggregation is already in place for manufacturers who have achieved serialization. Aggregation adds a step to the process: masslinking the contents of a case and assigning an identification number to the bundles. This requires additional software and hardware, but many suppliers provide the necessary hardware and all-in-one software to handle both